Elliott Erwitt “100 Fotografie”
Elliott Erwitt, FRANCE, Paris. 1989 © Elliott Erwitt.

Venue

Museo Diocesano
Piazza Sant'Eustorgio, 3, 20122 Milano MI
Website
http://www.museodiocesano.it/
Category

Date

27 May 2022 - 16 Oct 2022
Ongoing...

Cost

€8-6

Labels

Editors’ Pick

Elliott Erwitt “100 Fotografie”

The Museo Diocesano Carlo Maria Martini in Milan is hosting a retrospective dedicated to Elliott Erwitt, one of the most fascinating photographers of the 20th century.

Curated by Biba Giacchetti, the exhibition features one hundred of his most famous shots: from the most iconic black and white images to the lesser-known in color that Erwitt decided to use for his editorial, institutional, and advertising works, from politics to social issues, from architecture to cinema, and fashion.

“Also this year – declares Nadia Righi, director of the Museo Diocesano Carlo Maria Martini of Milan – the Diocesan Museum proposes a photography exhibition for the summer period, opening to the city also in the evening hours and offering in the pleasant space of the cloister various cultural activities”.

“The rooms of the museum,” continues Nadia Righi, “host an important retrospective dedicated to Elliott Erwitt, one of the most extraordinary photographers still living, of whom we present the most iconic images alongside other lesser-known ones, both in black and white and in color. There are many themes touched by Erwitt during his long career: portraits of important people from the world of politics or entertainment, the great events of history, children, travel reports, and also his own family. He always looks at reality, from the most famous to the most intimate and personal, with a curious look, sometimes with a subtle and delicate irony that makes his shots always fascinating and able to bring new reflections.

The exhibition traces the entire career of the American author and offers an insight into the history and customs of the twentieth century, through his typical irony, pervaded by a surreal and romantic vein, which identified him as the photographer of the human comedy.